Tequila-Spiked Mango Popsicles with Chile

Popsicles . . . it’s time to make popsicles. This is what I’ve been telling myself for weeks, months! But Todd, you’re a bartender. You can’t shake a popsicle. Not this time – not for the blog. Don’t worry, add some tequila, it will be fine. Say no more! I like my popsicles bursting with flavor, so for this recipe I added a ton of ripe mango. I grew up eating mango slices sprinkled with chile, so it was only natural that I do the same with these mango popsicles. Trust me, it’s the best flavor combo! I experimented with a few different kinds of chile: guajillo, ancho, and arbol, but feel free to have fun with it and choose your favorite.

Tequila-Spiked Mango Popsicles with Chile // HonestlyYUM

Tequila-Spiked Mango Popsicles with Chile // HonestlyYUM

Tequila-Spiked Mango Popsicles with Chile // HonestlyYUM

Tequila-Spiked Mango Popsicles with Chile // HonestlyYUM

Tequila-Spiked Mango Popsicles with Chile // HonestlyYUM

Tequila-Spiked Mango Popsicles with Chile // HonestlyYUM

Tequila-Spiked Mango Popsicles with Chile // HonestlyYUM

Tequila-Spiked Mango Popsicles with Chile // HonestlyYUM

Tequila-Spiked Mango Popsicles with Chile // HonestlyYUM

Tequila-Spiked Mango Popsicles with Chile // HonestlyYUM

Tequila-Spiked Mango Popsicles with Chile // HonestlyYUM

Tequila-Spiked Mango Popsicles

Fresh mango popsicles spiked with tequila and dipped in chile powder
Servings: ~10 popsicles

INGREDIENTS

INSTRUCTIONS

  1. Chop the mango. I like cutting large slices on either side of the pit and cubing the fruit so that it releases easily from the peel. Add the mango to the blender.
  2. Add the lime juice, agave, water, salt, and tequila to the blender.
  3. Puree the mixture until smooth and pour into the popsicle molds.
  4. Place the tray in the freezer. After approximately one hour, add the popsicle sticks. Freeze until solid.
  5. Once frozen, release the popsicles by running them under warm water for a few seconds.
  6. Dip the popsicles in chile powder to garnish (optional).

(images by HonestlyYUM)

Cardamom Moscow Mule

One of the original vodka cocktails, the Moscow Mule has its roots in Hollywood. It was conceived in the 1940’s as a promotional tool for what was, at the time, a rather unfashionable spirit. A deviously simple combination of vodka, lime, and ginger beer, the Moscow Mule even has its own fancy copper mug! For my version, instead of ginger beer which is carbonated with yeast, I cheated and crafted an extra strong ginger ale. And of course, I had to spice it up by adding a little cardamom. One sip is all you’ll need to convert even the biggest vodka cynic. I promise.

Cardamom Moscow Mule // HonestlyYUM

Cardamom Moscow Mule // HonestlyYUM READ MORE

Cardamom Ginger Ale

Cardamom Ginger Ale Recipe // HonestlyYUM

Ingredients:

  • 2 teaspoons of finely grated ginger
  • 5 cardamom pods
  • 1/2 cup evaporated cane sugar
  • 1/2 cup water
  • 1 cup sparkling water

Directions:

  • Peel and finely grate the ginger. Set aside.
  • Crack open the cardamom pods and grind the seeds using a spice grinder or mortar and pestle. Set aside.
  • Add sugar and water to a small saucepan over medium heat until sugar dissolves.
  • Add ginger and ground cardamom and simmer for 10 minutes. Remove from heat and let cool to room temperature.
  • Once the syrup has cooled, strain through a fine mesh strainer.
  • Transfer to a large jar or bottle and add sparkling water. Store in the refrigerator.
Cardamom Moscow Mule
One of the original vodka cocktails, the Moscow Mule has its roots in Hollywood. It was conceived in the 1940's as a promotional tool for what was, at the time, a rather unfashionable spirit.

cardamom.ginger.ale

(images by HonestlyYUM)

Bar Tartine + Pickled Dilly Beets Recipe

Bar Tartine is about as San Francisco as it gets. The menu is inspired by the local produce and almost everything is made from scratch. Although they change the menu from time to time, co-chefs Cortney and Nick have an uncategorizable approach to the food at Bar Tartine that is best described as globally inspired. The dishes may vary in flavors from Eastern European to Middle Eastern but are executed with Japanese techniques like using a dashi stock.

Bar Tartine 9

Last week, I had the pleasure of meeting Cortney and getting a behind-the-scenes glimpse at their sandwich shop. One of my favorite things Nick and Cortney do at Bar Tartine is their pickled veggies — they pickle just about everything. They’re the perfect accompaniment to Bar Tartine’s sandwiches that feature their phenomenal bread. I mean, honestly, smoked sturgeon deviled egg sandwiches? It doesn’t get much better (or more stunning) than that. Jump to the bottom and check out Bar Tartine’s recipe for pickled dilly beets that they graciously shared with me!

BarTartine 2

Bar Tartine 3 READ MORE

Yum, We Love . . .

My jackets and boots were really getting neglected in Los Angeles this summer, so I thought I’d give them some love in San Francisco’s “summer” weather. However, it won’t be all fog and cold as I’ll be going to Napa for a little romantic getaway this weekend! Any places I must go to in Napa or Sonoma?

  • This stunning time-lapse video of San Francisco’s fog by Simon Christen took two years to capture. Absolutely incredible.

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