One of our family Thanksgiving leftover traditions is to make stock out of the turkey bones. That stock eventually becomes rice porridge or sometimes a great soup, but we never just throw the bones out. And neither should you because this turkey pho will heal your soul. It is that good. If you’re making my smoked turkey this year (which I hope y’all are!), I wouldn’t suggest making the pho with the leftovers because it may impart too much smokiness into the broth. A classic roasted turkey is perfect for this. A good pho is all about the broth, but don’t be intimidated by it. The key is to simmer the stock low and slow so you get a clear and but flavorful broth. The other key is to char the shallots and ginger to get some of that sweetness and flavor out of them. If you don’t have access to some of these special ingredients like rice stick noodles or Thai basil, just improvise! The stock is so delicious you could make anything with it. And isn’t that what Thanksgiving leftovers are all about?

Turkey leftover pho | HonestlyYUM

Place all the turkey bones in a large stockpot and cover with 3 to 4 quarts of cold water. Don’t worry about getting all the meat off the bones. If there’s some left on there, just throw it all in, all the more flavor for the stock. Place the shallots (whole and with skins on) and the ginger (with the peel on) under the broiler for about 10-15 minutes, turning them every now and then so they char and blister on all sides. Allow them to cool enough to handle and peel the charred skins off the shallots and ginger. Cut the ginger into 2 or 3 smaller pieces. Place the shallots and ginger in the stockpot with the turkey.

Turkey pho | HonestlyYUM

In a small pan toast the cinnamon, star anise and cloves until they become fragrant. Put the spices into the stock pot. Bring the water to a boil and immediately turn the heat down to a very low simmer, so the surface is just moving. This is the key to giving you a clear broth, make sure the stock doesn’t boil vigorously. Allow the stock to simmer for about 3 to 4 hours, tasting in between. Halfway through, add salt to taste. When the broth is ready and you are ready to assemble the pho bowls, strain the stock through a large sieve into another pot. I like to strain half of it into a large 2 quart measuring cup with a spout so it’s easy to pour into the bowls.

Noodles and ingredients

To assemble, dip the rice stick noodles in boiling water for about 5 seconds. If using dried noodles, follow the package instructions. Strain and divide into your pho bowls. Add a little handful of fresh cilantro and scallions to each bowl of noodles. Thinly slice your turkey meat and add it to the bowl. Pour the strained turkey broth over each bowl.

Turkey pho broth

Garnish with a handful of fresh bean sprouts, a few leaves of Thai basil, a few slices of chiles and a little lime juice.

Basil

Slurp it in and enjoy!

Turkey Pho

TURKEY PHO

Ingredients:

  • 1 leftover turkey carcass and left over turkey meat
  • 3-4 qts of cold water
  • 4 large shallots
  • 1 4-5 inch piece of ginger
  • 1 stick cinnamon
  • 4 star anise
  • 1 tsp whole cloves
  • sea or kosher salt
  • 32 ounces of fresh rice stick noodles (or dried)
  • 1 large bunch of Thai basil
  • 1 small bundle of cilantro, chopped
  • 1 bunch of scallions, chopped
  • a few large handfuls of bean sprouts
  • 3-4 chiles, thinly sliced
  • 3 limes, cut in wedges

Directions:

  • Place all the turkey bones in a large stockpot and cover with 3 to 4 quarts of cold water. If there’s some left on there, just throw it all in, all the more flavor for the stock.
  • Place the shallots (whole and with skins on) and the ginger (with the peel on) under the broiler for about 10-15 minutes, turning them every now and then so they char and blister on all sides.
  • Allow them to cool enough to handle and peel the charred skins off the shallots and ginger. Cut the ginger into 2 or 3 smaller pieces. Place the shallots and ginger in the stockpot with the turkey.
  • In a small pan toast the cinnamon, star anise and cloves until they become fragrant. Put the spices into the stock pot.
  • Bring the water to a boil and immediately turn the heat down to a very low simmer, so the surface is barely moving. This is the key to giving you a clear broth. Allow the stock to simmer for about 3 to 4 hours, tasting in between. Halfway through, add salt to taste.
  • When the broth is ready and you are ready to assemble the pho bowls, strain the stock through a large sieve into another pot. I like to strain it into a large 4 quart measuring cup with a spout so it’s easy to pour into the bowls.
  • To assemble, dip the rice stick noodles in boiling water for about 5 seconds. If using dried noodles, follow the package instructions. Strain and divide into your pho bowls.
  • Add a little handful of fresh cilantro and scallions to each bowl of noodles. Thinly slice your turkey meat and add it to the bowl. Pour the strained turkey broth over each bowl.
  • Garnish with a handful of fresh bean sprouts, a few leaves of Thai basil, a few slices of chiles and a little lime juice.

(images by HonestlyYUM)